RE/MAX 440
Roxanne Christy
4092 Skippack Pike, P.O. Box 880
Skippack  PA 19474
 Phone: 610-584-1160
Office Phone: 610-584-1160
Cell: 267-252-0567
Fax: 267-354-6977 
rchristy@remax440.com
Roxanne Christy

My Blog

What Does Your Sleep Style Say About Your Intelligence?

August 25, 2017 2:00 am

We all have our own sleep preferences, from bedtime to atmosphere and sleep position. However, new research suggests the position you sleep in can actually tell you a lot about yourself – your health, your age, perhaps even your education level.

Commissioned by the Better Sleep Council (BSC), the new study found those who reported higher levels of education, such as graduate school or more, were less likely to sleep in fetal position, which is the most common sleeping position among Americans (47 percent). The study also noted differences between age groups in reported sleep position preferences as well: Gen Xers and Millennials were more likely to sleep in Freefall position (arms and legs outstretched) than Baby Boomers.

It's no real surprise that the study also found sleep positions affect sleep quality. For example, people who sleep in the log position report getting a better night sleep than those in the fetal. Also, people who sleep in the starfish or log positions are more likely to sleepwalk.

Other insights from the study include:

- Women are more likely to sleep in the fetal position compared to men (54 percent vs. 39 percent).

- The soldier (11 percent), starfish (7 percent) and log (6 percent) sleep positions are the least popular, yet those who sleep in these positions are more likely to say it has medical benefits.

- Log sleepers are more likely than fetal, freefall or yearner sleepers to say their mattress is very comfortable. It could be they feel this way because they're more likely than other sleepers to lay down and test their mattress before purchasing.

BSC sleep expert Terry Cralle, RN, a certified sleep educator and author, offers these better sleep position tips:

Back sleepers (soldier or starfish) – Sleeping on your back may induce lower back pain and sleep apnea, which interferes with normal sleep. If you experience back pain, consider placing a pillow or rolled-up towel under your knees to align the natural curve of your spine.

Stomach sleepers (freefall) – Sleeping this way can cause strain on your lower back and can cause potential neck pain. Try using a soft pillow or none at all when sleeping, so your neck won't be at an awkward angle.

Side sleepers (log, yearner, fetal) – Side sleeping is one of the most common ways to sleep; sleep specialists recommend you sleep on your side in order to rest more comfortably and lessen the likelihood of interrupted sleep.

For more information on sleep positions, including visuals on each one, visit http://bettersleep.org/better-sleep/sleep-positions.

Published with permission from RISMedia.


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Last Minute Things to Do Before Back-to-School

August 25, 2017 2:00 am

For parents, back-to-school is looming on the horizon. But that doesn't mean you can't squeeze a bit more out of the season! Below are a handful things you can still do with your family before they head to school, offered by Booking.com.

Plan a last-minute family vacation: They are so important not only for reducing stress, but for bonding and making memories, and a trip doesn't have to be expensive. Use a travel app or website like Booking.com. They have more than one million unique places to stay for any budget, from five star hotels, to villas, to boats and even tree houses! No matter what you buy or reserve online always check out reviews, they can be so important.  

Bargain hunt: Back to school spending is expected to top $27 billion dollars! Every year more and more moms are shopping online because it's easier to price compare without the kids in tow. On trend clothing this year is denim on denim, embroidery and hoodies, but shoes are a must-have and finding a great way to get the latest most popular shoes at a better price is key. Rack Room Shoes has an ongoing promotion that offers a buy one pair get one 50-percent off! You can find everything from Adidas, to Nikes, to Pumas, and there's a great selection of trendy backpacks, and fun lunch bags.

Stay organized: Dealing with after school chaos can always be huge task. And then I found a great new app to help streamline everything. BAND is the leading group communication app, and it's great at streamlining school and after-school activity planning. We all know what it's like to get those weekly emails from a team or group, lost among hundreds of other emails, it's particularly frustrating when you're a coach or group organizer. The app keeps schedules, messaging with the teams and parents, and any last minute updates all in one place. You can even share photos privately with the group.

Summer to school transition: Bedtime and mealtime can be more flexible during the summer. Try to start getting into the school year routine before the first bell. It's easier to get kids to go to bed earlier, if you wake them up earlier. And while studies show social media is not directly connected to poor school performance, the closer a device is, the more distracting it is…even if it's turned off. So park the phone at bedtime, and in the locker during school hours.

Source:  https://www.multivu.com, betterstuffforlife.com

Published with permission from RISMedia.


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Healthy Habits to Start the School Year Right

August 24, 2017 2:00 am

Whether it’s the first day of kindergarten, or the beginning of senior year in high school, trading summer’s laid-back habits for a more regimented routine is never easy. But things tend to go more smoothly for families who re-focus on safety, good nutrition, and good habits.

Family physicians and child-rearing authorities suggest where to put the emphasis:

Healthy eating – It’s easier to pour a bowl of cereal than to whip up an omelet in the morning. But while some cereals provide some nutrition, a protein-based scramble beats the you-know-what out of sugared oats – and eating healthy food keeps kids full longer, making them better able to focus and learn. Pack lunches and snacks – as well as the dinner table – with proteins, fruits, veggies and healthy carbs.

Regular bedtimes – Between dinner, homework, lessons, sports, and playtime, it can be challenging to keep a set bedtime. But studies show kids who keep regular bedtime routines are calmer and less likely to act out. To ease your child into a scheduled bedtime, try lowering the lights and reading a story 30 minutes before sleep time.

Exercise – Kids who walk or ride bikes to school and/or get a workout on the playground get a good start on healthy exercise. But whether they’re doing homework or playing video games, too many kids become couch potatoes after school. Give them lots of opportunity to play outdoors  and exercise their bodies as well as their minds.

Safety – Much as we’d like to go back to Mayberry, today’s world is not a safe one. Teaching young kids about stranger danger, and how to handle emergencies is more than ever vital. Even the youngest children should be taught to walk in groups, watch for traffic, wear helmets, and stay alert. Play-acting hypothetical situations such as bullying, reacting to approaching strangers, and handling common playground disagreements are a good way to prepare your kids without scaring them.

Family time – Family mealtimes and family game nights are great opportunities for parents and children to reconnect. Mealtimes, especially, give children the chance to express their feelings and talk about what they are doing in school and with their peers. Recent studies show that family time leads to higher self-esteem and grades and lowers the rates of substance abuse, teen pregnancy and depression.

Published with permission from RISMedia.


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How to Appreciate Your AC Unit

August 24, 2017 2:00 am

The heat of the summer is winding down, but ask yourself: Have you thanked your AC unit for its hard work this summer?

With that in mind, experts from One Hour Heating and Air Conditioning® encourage homeowners to do the following:

Show your unit some love. Your air conditioner collects dust, leaves and other debris that degrade its performance over time. After shutting off the power to the unit, remove debris and trim any shrubs back from the unit.

Have a monthly date with your A/C to change the filter. Your air conditioner breathes through its filter, and when that filter becomes clogged, your unit struggles. A dirty filter can cause your fan to wear out prematurely and can sharply increase your energy use. Make a habit of replacing these on time.

Schedule a play date with your AC's best friend (i.e. a licensed technician!). It's important to tune up your AC unit annually. A thorough tune-up from a licensed technician is the only way to give the machine a thorough inspection to make sure everything is operating as it should. You'll experience fewer breakdowns, lower energy bills and a longer life for your air conditioner.

Give your A/C a break by conducting periodic energy audits to help identify opportunities for energy savings. Through this process, you can seal up leaky ducts, upgrade insulation, locate hidden drafts and more -- all of which is good for your air conditioner and your wallet.

Source: One Hour Heating & Air Conditioning®

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Bringing Nostalgia Back to Road Trips

August 24, 2017 2:00 am

(Family Features)--A family road trip can bring on a strong sense of nostalgia. Although much has likely changed since you embarked on your first journey as a child, there are still plenty of ways to appreciate road tripping with the family and bring the best of "then" to "now."

Seating selection. A generation ago, road trips meant putting down the seats in the station wagon and creating a giant play space in the rear of the car. Keep the same spirit in your road trips now by attaching a travel kit in an accessible bag or organizer to the front seat backs to hold plenty of diversions. If you plan your trip well, you can build in frequent stretching breaks to coincide with points of interest along the way.

Electronic-free entertainment. Handheld devices and headphones may be the norm for this generation, but there's no time like a family road trip to put down the electronics. Old-school games like I Spy and The Alphabet Game add some free, fun entertainment that encourages a look out the window at the passing surroundings. Other games that never get old: Make the Trucker Honk and competing to see who can find the most cows, windmills or whatever fits your region.

Vehicle maintenance. Remember the old 3-months or 3,000-mile oil change rule? Forget about it. Most of today's vehicle manufacturers recommend changing your oil every 5,000-7,500 miles. However, to prepare for your family road trip and avoid mechanical failures along the way, most mechanics will offer the same tip: change the oil. If you haven't already, consider making the switch to a synthetic motor oil to help your engine achieve maximum performance and extend the time between oil changes to give you more time on the open road. An AAA engine oil research study confirmed synthetic motor oil performs better than conventional motor oil by nearly 50 percent. Also remember to check your vehicle's fluids, battery, wipers, tire tread and air pressure to ensure road-trip readiness. Refer to your vehicle's owner's manual for the recommended maintenance information according to the manufacturer.

Gas prices. When the Griswold family hit the road on their infamous trek to Walley World 34 years ago, gas rang up at $1.16 a gallon. Today the national average for a gallon of gas is $2.49. While yesterday's gas prices will likely never return, a road trip is still an economical choice for families. Consider a one-tank destination over a cross-country trek to help deliver a memorable experience with your family.

No matter where your trip down memory lane takes you, be sure to remember what the magic of the open road is all about: freedom, adventure and good, old-fashioned family fun.

Source: kendallmotoroil.com/roadtrip.

Published with permission from RISMedia.


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America’s Favorite Investment? Real Estate

August 23, 2017 2:00 am

Looking for the best way to invest your money long-term? Most Americans say real estate is the way to go.

According to a recent report from Bankrate.com, when asked the best way to invest money not needed for more than 10 years, 28 percent of U.S. adults replied real estate, followed by cash investments (23 percent), the stock market (17 percent), gold/other precious metals (15 percent) and bonds (4 percent).

The Bankrate.com survey has been conducted five years in a row and this is the third straight time real estate has grabbed the number one slot. Interestingly, the stock market has never placed higher than third, which is particularly surprising since the S&P 500 is up more than 50 percent since the question was first asked in July 2013.

Republicans and households with annual incomes of $75,000 or more were the only demographic groups to select stocks as their preferred long-term investments. Baby Boomers and members of the Silent Generation were more likely to choose stocks than millennials and Gen Xers.

The Bankrate.com Financial Security Index dipped slightly recently, but is still at its third-best reading since the Index debuted in Dec. 2010. Four of the five components have improved from 12 months ago: job security, comfort level with debt, net worth and overall financial situation. However, Americans are feeling slightly worse about their savings relative to last year.

Feel free to contact me if you’d like more information about investing in real estate.

Source: Bankrate.com

Published with permission from RISMedia.


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How to Save for Your Child's College Tuition

August 23, 2017 2:00 am

Whether your child is five or fifteen, saving for their future is important. It's never too early to start squirreling away money for tuition. To help, MassMutual offers the following five tips for families planning and saving for college:

Start early. Start saving what you can at birth. Little monthly or annual savings really add up over 18 years.  

Make it automatic. Consider automating checking account or payroll deductions to interest-earning savings accounts specifically designed for higher education, such as a 529 savings plan.

Encourage monetary gifts (including 529 plan gift cards) from family members and friends for college savings plans for gift-giving events. Prior to your child's birthday and holidays, remind loved ones that the best gift they can give is the gift of a strong future.

Know how much you need to save. Determine how much you need to save using free online tools such as MassMutual's college savings calculator.

Protect your loved ones for unexpected events. In addition to saving for school, life and disability income insurance are solid considerations for parents with children.

Source: MassMutual

Published with permission from RISMedia.


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Save Money Through Energy Efficiency

August 23, 2017 2:00 am

(Family Features)--As much as half of the average homeowner's monthly utility expenses go toward cooling and heating, according to the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE). For many households, that makes energy the largest home-related expense each month, next to a mortgage payment.

Fortunately, numerous technological advances are making it easier than ever to manage home energy use. In fact, the DOE estimates you can save as much as 10 percent a year on energy costs by simply adjusting the temperature up or down when you're away during the day. Installing a programmable thermostat that never forgets to adjust on a busy morning and kicks back on before you arrive home can help you earn these savings and reduce energy consumption.

Home Automation
Newer smart, programmable thermostats can be controlled remotely by internet-connected devices, such as tablets and smartphones. Some models can also monitor your energy usage and system efficiency, providing data to help you make further adjustments to how you operate your HVAC system.

Lighting is another major energy challenge. However, smart light bulbs let you adjust your home's ambiance (and energy usage) with just a couple of quick taps. Paired with motion sensors that detect movement (or a lack thereof) and adjust lighting accordingly, smart bulbs can help reduce the waste of energy caused by lighting unused rooms.

Similarly, smartphone applications that connect to other appliances, utilities and home features offer the best of personalized comfort and convenience while providing tools to help minimize your home's energy consumption.

Zoned Climate Control
If you're like most homeowners, there are parts of your house that simply don't get much use or only get used during certain times of the day. Maintaining the temperature in those uninhabited areas can be costly and wasteful. As an alternative, an option such as zoned climate control allows you to stay comfortable in the rooms you use without spending a fortune on energy bills.

While a zoned system is generally considered a premium home feature, it isn't unattainable and actually offers long-term savings, due to its energy-efficient operation. The home is divided into zones, designated by floors, rooms or areas - however the homeowner chooses - which eliminates the "all on" feature of traditional air conditioners.

A system like Mitsubishi Electric Cooling & Heating's Zoned Comfort Solutions offers a true zoning-system with convenient controls and automation, along with whisper-quiet operation. Both ducted and non-ducted units are available depending on the space and occupant needs. Additionally, some models have advanced filtration features to help eliminate allergens, contributing to improved air quality.

For a new build, installing a zoned system from the outset is relatively simple. However, zoned systems are also a possible solution for replacing your home's HVAC system or rectifying a problem with a single uncomfortable room. Pairing the system with sensors or remote app controls can bring operating costs even lower through computerized automation.

Renewable Energy
Another option to offset some of your home's energy and utility costs is generating your own renewable energy through solar or wind power systems. Installation depends on many variables, such as how much energy you use, local codes and standards, and whether the house and surrounding terrain are situated to allow you to capture adequate natural power. For a home under construction, your builder should be able to offer guidance; for an existing home, contacting a local renewable energy organization or state office is a smart first step.

Cost Control
A state-of-the-art zoned climate control system can be configured to your specific needs, but all the customization options can make it tricky to predict how much your installation might cost. Taking into account these variables can give you a better sense of how much you'll be spending.

 New equipment. Each system includes an outdoor unit, indoor unit(s), controls and parts including the refrigerant line-set, wiring and electrical accessories. Conditioning one room or zone comes at a significantly different price than cooling and heating a home with eight or more zones. Generally, new equipment comes in between $3,000-$15,000, depending on the number of zones and size of the home.

Labor. This is what you will pay a licensed HVAC contractor to install the system (and remove your old one, if necessary). Contractors' labor prices vary widely, but expect to spend an amount roughly equal to your equipment cost, depending on your geographic location and the complexity of the installation.

Additional costs. Depending on your existing system, you may incur costs for items such as electrical work to install a new 240V outlet ($200-$1,000, or more if your electrical panel requires a new circuit); an equipment pad, stand or brackets for the outdoor unit ($50-$300); ductwork (prices vary greatly depending on the home); and controller options (approximately $200-$300 each).

Unique situations. Some homes, such as older homes, high-performance homes and homes in extreme cold-weather regions, often require auxiliary heat or specialized designs or equipment, all of which can impact the cost of the system. However, with Mitsubishi Electric's Zoned Comfort Solutions, 100 percent heating down to a 5 F outdoor temperature can be attained.

Rebates. Some states offer rebates for the installation of more energy-efficient appliances, including HVAC systems. These rebates can help offset some of the upfront costs associated with installing zoned systems. Consider speaking with a professional or researching available rebates in your region before purchasing a new system.

Source: Mitsubishi Electric Cooling & Heating

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5 Quick Curb Appeal Projects

August 22, 2017 2:00 am

Need to add some curb appeal to your home to get it ready for market? Or are you just in the mood for a quick refresh? Here are five easy DIY projects to help dress up your home using lightweight, decorative millwork accessories or architectural elements. The composition and durability of the products make them a long-lasting, low-maintenance way to dress up your home for years to come.

Entry Door - Make a front entry door 'pop' by surrounding it on both sides with a set of decorative pilasters and topping it off with a pediment. Select from simple peaked pediments or more ornate acorn or rams-head pediments.

Brackets - Install lightweight decorative brackets to a porch or under an eave for a fast way to personalize a home.

Windows - Add a simple header directly over the exterior of a window frame to add more visual appeal to the window. Select from straight or arched headers for the style that best matches your home.

Column Wraps - If your home has worn or boring porch posts, hide them with PVC column wraps. These decorative pieces fit right over a post for an instant makeover.

Shutters - If your shutters are suffering from peeling paint or worn finishes, consider replacing them with UV-resistant polyurethane shutters. Made to resist moisture and insects, such shutters can be quickly installed and will maintain their curb appeal for years to come.
 
If you’d like more homeowner information, please contact me.

Source: Nu-Wood

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A Back-to-School Guide for Parents

August 22, 2017 2:00 am

Back-to-school season can be a crazy, hectic time, especially if you have more than one child at more than one school. Regardless of how many kids you have or how old they are, every parent can use a little help during the new school season. USAGov offers the following tips to help:

Schedule time with teachers. Keep an open dialog with school staff to help your children thrive.

Get those shots. Some schools require immunization records for entry. Find out if your child needs any vaccines before school starts.

Ease into the school routine. A good night's sleep is key to a successful school day. Preschoolers need 11-12 hours of sleep a night, school-age children need at least 10 hours, while teens need 9-10 hours.

Pack a healthy and safe lunch. Choose a balanced meal for your children's lunchbox and make sure you keep hot foods hot and cold foods cold. Low-income families may qualify for free or reduced price school meals.

Shop smart. Some states have sales tax holidays in August. Make a list, know what you need, and shop the sales. Knowing where the bargains are will help you save.

Talk to your kids about online safety. Identity theft, cyberbullying, or inappropriate behavior can happen online. Teach your children about online safety as they use social media to connect with old and new friends at school.

Plan and practice how to get to school. If your kids' school or school system provides bus transportation, find the nearest stop to your home and the pickup and drop-off times. Teach your kids to be safe whether by car, bus, bicycle, or walking.

Teach time management. Leisure time, sports, and "screen time" can interfere with homework. Keep your family's schedule on time with these tips.

Make sure kids are insured. Your child could qualify for free or low-cost insurance through Medicaid or the Children's Health Insurance Program (CHIP).

Listen to your kids. Anxiety and nerves can take over, so provide a safe environment at home and in the classroom. Talk to kids about bullying and what to do if they encounter it.

Get tax credits on tuition. Check out the IRS website for tips to see what kind of tax credits you can get based on the price of education.

Learn money management. No student wants to interrupt his or her education because of financial troubles. Visit USA.gov to get age-appropriate checklists to help students manage finances while in elementary school, high school, or college.

Source: USAGov

Published with permission from RISMedia.


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